The Art Of Thinking

Philosophy

Dagobert D. Runes, „The Art Of Thinking“
Big Questions from Little People: And Simple Answers from Great Minds by Gemma Elwin Harris
David Harvey , „Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason“
Lewis S. Ford, „Transforming Process Theism“
Bas Van Bommel, „Classical Humanism and the Challenge of Modernity: Debates on Classical Education in 19th-century Germany“

Dagobert D. Runes, „The Art Of Thinking“

2011 | pages: 96 | ISBN: 1258122669 | EPUB | 0,3 mb

Format Paperback Subject Literary Collections

Big Questions from Little People: And Simple Answers from Great Minds by Gemma Elwin Harris

English | October 30th, 2012 | ASIN: B007QWXS3Q, ISBN: 0062223224 | 341 pages | EPUB | 1.11 MB

In the spirit of Schott’s Miscellany, The Magic of Reality, and The Dangerous Book for Boys comes Can a Bee Sting a Bee?—a smart, illuminating, essential, and utterly delightful handbook for perplexed parents and their curious children. Author Gemma Elwin Harris has lovingly compiled weighty questions from precocious grade school children—queries that have long dumbfounded even intelligent adults—and she’s gathered together a notable crew of scientists, specialists, philosophers, and writers to answer them.
Authors Mary Roach and Phillip Pullman, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, chef Gordon Ramsay, adventurist Bear Gryllis, and linguist Noam Chomsky are among the top experts responding to the Big Questions from Little People, (“Do animals have feelings?”, “Why can’t I tickle myself?”, “Who is God?”) with well-known comedians, columnists, and raconteurs offering hilarious alternative answers. Miles above your average general knowledge and trivia collections, this charming compendium is a book fans of the E.H. Gombrich classic, A Little History of the World, will adore.

David Harvey , „Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason“

2017 | ISBN-10: 0190691484 | 252 pages | PDF | 9 MB

Karl Marx’s Capital is one of the most important texts written in the modern era. Since 1867, when the first of its three volumes was published, it has had a profound effect on politics and economics in theory and practice throughout the world. But Marx wrote in the context of capitalism in the second half of the nineteenth century: his assumptions and analysis need to be updated in order to address to the technological, economic, and industrial change that has followed Capital’s initial publication.
In Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason, David Harvey not only provides a concise distillation of his famous course on Capital, but also makes the text relevant to the twenty-first century’s continued processes of globalization. Harvey shows the work’s continuing analytical power, doing so in the clearest and simplest terms but never compromising its depth and complexity.
Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason provides an accessible window into Harvey’s unique approach to Marxism and takes readers on a riveting roller coaster ride through recent global history. It demonstrates how and why Capital remains a living, breathing document with an outsized influence on contemporary social thought.

Lewis S. Ford, „Transforming Process Theism“

2000 | pages: 397 | ISBN: 0791445356 | PDF | 2,0 mb

Traces variations of theism in Whitehead’s principle works, identifying a major problem in conventional understanding of process theism and constructing an original and provocative solution.

Bas Van Bommel, „Classical Humanism and the Challenge of Modernity: Debates on Classical Education in 19th-century Germany“

2015 | pages: 234 | ISBN: 311036543X | EPUB | 0,6 mb

In scholarship, classical (Renaissance) humanism is usually strictly distinguished from ’neo-humanism‘, which, especially in Germany, flourished at the beginning of the 19th century. While most classical humanists focused on the practical imitation of Latin stylistic models, ’neohumanism‘ is commonly believed to have been mainly inspired by typically modern values, such as authenticity and historicity.
Bas van Bommel shows that whereas ’neohumanism‘ was mainly adhered to at the German universities, at the Gymnasien a much more traditional educational ideal prevailed, which is best described as ‚classical humanism.‘ This ideal involved the prioritisation of the Romans above the Greeks, as well as the belief that imitation of Roman and Greek models brings about man’s aesthetic and moral elevation.
Van Bommel makes clear that 19th century classical humanism dynamically related to modern society. On the one hand, classical humanists explained the value of classical education in typically modern terms. On the other hand, competitors of the classical Gymnasium laid claim to values that were ultimately derived from classical humanism. 19th century classical humanism should therefore not be seen as a dried-out remnant of a dying past, but as the continuation of a living tradition.