The Private World of Ottoman Women

History / Military

The Private World of Ottoman Women by Godfrey Goodwin
Guernica: Painting the End of the World (The Landmark Library) by James Attlee
The King’s City: A History of London During The Restoration: The City that Transformed a Nation by Don Jordan
Searching for the Amazons: The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World by John Man
Color in the Age of Impressionism: Commerce, Technology, and Art (Refiguring Modernism) by Laura Anne Kalba

The Private World of Ottoman Women by Godfrey Goodwin

English | February 1, 2007 | ISBN: 0863567452, 0863567517 | EPUB | pages | 3.9 MB

Reconstructing the role of women in Ottoman high society and power politics, Godfrey Goodwin brings to life the women who made their marks in a male domain.
He examines the laws which governed women’s lives from the harem to the humblest tasks, and contrasts the lives of rural women with those of women in the towns, discussing pivotal events such as courtship, marriage, divorce, and motherhood.
This perceptive study culminates in the nineteenth century, exploring the advent of modernity and its impact at a time of imperial decline.

Guernica: Painting the End of the World (The Landmark Library) by James Attlee

English | October 5, 2017 | ISBN: 1786691442 | EPUB | 236 pages | 83.3 MB

Pablo Picasso had already accepted a commission in 1937 to create a work for the Spanish Republican Pavilion at the Paris World Fair when news arrived of the assault by the German Condor Legion on the undefended Basque town of Guernica, in which hundreds of civilians died.
James Attlee offers an illuminating account of the genesis, creation and many-stranded afterlife of Picasso’s Guernica. He explores the historical context from which it sprang; the artistic influences that informed its execution; the critical responses that it elicited; its journeyings across Europe and America in the late 1930s; its post-war adoption by new generations of anti-war protestors; and its eventual return to Spain following the death of Franco.

The King’s City: A History of London During The Restoration: The City that Transformed a Nation by Don Jordan

English | February 6, 2018 | ISBN: 1681776383, ASIN: B074D4Y8PR | AZW3 | 544 pages | 2.3 MB

A tantalizing and thrilling history of London at the time of King Charles II, from the acclaimed co-author of The King’s Revenge and The King’s Bed.
During the reign of Charles II, London was a city in flux. After years of civil war and political turmoil, England’s capital became the center for major advances in the sciences, the theatre, architecture, trade and ship-building that paved the way for the creation of the British Empire.
At the heart of this activity was the King, whose return to power from exile in 1660 lit the fuse for an explosion in activity in all spheres of city life. London flourished, its wealth, vibrancy and success due to many figures famous today including Christopher Wren, Samuel Pepys, and John Dryden ― and others whom history has overlooked until now.
Throughout the quarter-century Charles was on the throne, London suffered several serious reverses: the plague in 1665 and the Great Fire in 1666, and severe defeat in the Second Anglo-Dutch War, which brought about notable economic decline. But thanks to the genius and resilience of the people of London, and the occasionally wavering stewardship of the King, the city rose from the ashes to become the economic capital of Europe.
The King’s City tells the gripping story of a city that defined a nation and birthed modern Britain ― and how the vision of great individuals helped to build the richly diverse place we know today.

Searching for the Amazons: The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World by John Man

English | February 27, 2018 | ISBN: 1681776758, ASIN: B074D56MWW | AZW3 | 304 pages | 5.2 MB

A deeply researched and sweeping history that redefines our understanding of the Amazons and their culture, tracking the ancient legend into the modern world and examining its significance today.
Since the time of the ancient Greeks we have been fascinated by accounts of the Amazons, an elusive tribe of hard-fighting, horse-riding female warriors. Equal to men in battle, legends claimed they cut off their right breasts to improve their archery skills and routinely killed their male children to purify their ranks.
For centuries people believed in their existence and attempted to trace their origins. Artists and poets celebrated their battles and wrote of Amazonia. Spanish explorers, carrying these tales to South America, thought they lived in the forests of the world’s greatest river, and named it after them. In the absence of evidence, we eventually reasoned away their existence, concluding that these powerful, sexually liberated female soldiers must have been the fantastical invention of Greek myth and storytelling. Until now.
Following decades of new research and a series of groundbreaking archeological discoveries, we now know these powerful warrior queens did indeed exist. In Searching for the Amazons, John Man travels to the grasslands of Central Asia―from the edge of the ancient Greek world to the borderlands of China―to discover the truth about the truth about these women whose legend has resonated over the centuries.

Color in the Age of Impressionism: Commerce, Technology, and Art (Refiguring Modernism) by Laura Anne Kalba

English | April 21, 2017 | ISBN: 027107700X | EPUB | 288 pages | 52.3 MB

This study analyzes the impact of color-making technologies on the visual culture of nineteenth-century France, from the early commercialization of synthetic dyes to the Lumière brothers’ perfection of the autochrome color photography process. Focusing on Impressionist art, Laura Anne Kalba examines the importance of dyes produced in the second half of the nineteenth century to the vision of artists such as Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Claude Monet.
The proliferation of vibrant new colors in France during this time challenged popular understandings of realism, abstraction, and fantasy in the realms of fine art and popular culture. More than simply adding a touch of spectacle to everyday life, Kalba shows, these bright, varied colors came to define the development of a consumer culture increasingly based on the sensual appeal of color. Impressionism—emerging at a time when inexpensively produced color functioned as one of the principal means by and through which people understood modes of visual perception and signification—mirrored and mediated this change, shaping the ways in which people made sense of both modern life and modern art.
Demonstrating the central importance of color history and technologies to the study of visuality, Color in the Age of Impressionism adds a dynamic new layer to our understanding of visual and material culture.

The Private World of Ottoman Women.epub
3.86 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
The King's City A History of London During The Restoration The City that Transformed a Nation.epub
2.36 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Guernica Painting the End of the World.epub
83.30 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Color in the Age of Impressionism Commerce, Technology, and Art.epub
52.31 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Searching for the Amazons The Real Warrior Women of the Ancient World.epub
4.73 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.