Relocated Memories The Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1846-1870

Cultures / Languages

Marguérite Corporaal, „Relocated Memories: The Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1846-1870“
Douwe Fokkema, Elrud Ibsch, „Knowledge And Commitment: A Problem Oriented Approach To Literary Studies“
Tuire Valkeakari, „Religious Idiom and the African American Novel, 1952-1998“
Christopher C. Fennell, „Crossroads and Cosmologies: Diasporas and Ethnogenesis in the New World“
Ellen Carol Jones, Morris Beja, „Twenty-First Joyce“

Marguérite Corporaal, „Relocated Memories: The Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1846-1870“

2017 | ISBN-10: 0815634986, 0815635133 | 328 pages | PDF | 18 MB

The Great Famine radically transformed Ireland; nearly one million people of the rural countryside died, and the eviction of farmers led to massive emigration. The Famine encouraged anti-English, nationalist sentiments, and this trauma is seen as pivotal in the development of an Irish anticolonial consciousness and in the identity formation of transatlantic Irish communities. In Relocated Memories, Corporaal challenges the persistent assumption that the first decades after the Great Irish Famine were marked by a pervasive silence on the catastrophe. Discussing works by well-known authors such as William Carleton and Anthony Trollope as well as more obscure texts by, among others, Dillon O’Brien and Susanna Meredith, Corporaal charts the reconfigurations of memory in fiction across generations and national borders.

Douwe Fokkema, Elrud Ibsch, „Knowledge And Commitment: A Problem Oriented Approach To Literary Studies“

2000 | pages: 229 | ISBN: 9027222223 | PDF | 1,2 mb

The authors present a new perspective on a wide range of issues in the study of literature and culture. Some of the topics discussed, such as interpretation, canon formation, and literary historiography, belong to the traditional domain of literary studies. Others ― cultural identity, convention, systems theory, and empirical methods ― originate in the social sciences and are now being integrated into the humanities. By referring to the work of authors as widely apart as Hayden White, Edward Said, Fredric Jameson, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Reinhart Koselleck, Pierre Bourdieu, Niklas Luhmann, Siegfried Schmidt, Norbert Groeben, and many others, the full complexity of the field of literary studies becomes apparent.The authors argue for a distinction between analysis of literary systems on the one hand and critical intervention on the other. By distinguishing between research and criticism, between knowledge and commitment, they offer new ways for literary studies as well as for cultural critique.

Tuire Valkeakari, „Religious Idiom and the African American Novel, 1952-1998“

2007 | pages: 273 | ISBN: 0813030552 | PDF | 1,3 mb

In this study of novels by Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Leon Forrest, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan, John Edgar Wideman, Gayl Jones, and Octavia E. Butler, Tuire Valkeakari examines the creative re-visioning and reshaping of Judeo-Christian idiom and imagery by African American novelists–specifically their use of „sacred“ language for secular meaning. She shows that in writing about the complexities of American selfhood and nationhood, these authors neither abandon religious idiom nor evangelize. Rather, they delight in reshaping their chosen raw material for their own purposes, which often have little to do with the material’s original context or function. Their use of biblically derived idiom is marked by innovative secular subversion and by stories of spiritual quest that defy conventional dogmatic definitions. These authors evoke religious rhetoric to study and revisit Martin Luther King Jr.’s concept of the “beloved community” and to express their yearning for an inclusive love ethic that could transcend any boundaries drawn in the name of race, class, gender, or religion.Beginning with the functions of Christian idiom in African American letters from the 1770s to the 1920s Harlem Renaissance and its aftermath, followed by an analysis of post-1950 novels, Valkeakari shows how, generation after generation, African American writers have evoked Christian rhetoric to advocate civil rights and democracy. Their treatment of this legacy reached a new level of creativity in the latter half of the 20th century, becoming a more pervasive characteristic of the African American novel than ever before.

Christopher C. Fennell, „Crossroads and Cosmologies: Diasporas and Ethnogenesis in the New World“

2007 | pages: 192 | ISBN: 0813031419 | PDF | 1,9 mb

Christopher Fennell offers a fresh perspective on ways that the earliest enslaved Africans preserved vital aspects of their traditions and identities in the New World. He also explores similar developments among European immigrants and the interactions of both groups with Native Americans. Focusing on extant artifacts left by displaced Africans, Fennell finds that material culture and religious ritual contributed to a variety of modes of survival in mainland North America as well as in the Caribbean and Brazil. Over time, new symbols of culture led to further changes in individual customs and beliefs as well as the creation of new social groups and new expressions of identity. Presenting insights from archaeology, history, and symbolic anthropology, this book traces the dynamic legacy of the trans-Atlantic diasporas over four centuries, and it challenges existing concepts of creolization and cultural retention. In the process, it examines some of the major cultural belief systems of west and west central Africa, specific symbols of the BaKongo and Yoruba cosmologies, development of prominent African-American religious expressions in the Americas, and the Christian and non-Christian spiritual traditions of German-speaking immigrants from central Europe.

Ellen Carol Jones, Morris Beja, „Twenty-First Joyce“

2004 | pages: 305 | ISBN: 0813027608 | PDF | 3,9 mb

By showing Joyce’s continued relevance to literary scholarship in the new century, Twenty-First Joyce previews the future of James Joyce studies. The essays feature Joycean takes on various types of literary criticism, including linguistics, comparative studies, translation, and aesthetics. Some of the foremost Joycean scholars provide particularly strong examples of the value of cultural and comparative studies brought to bear on his work, and they demonstrate the extent to which James Joyce has affected and influenced our cultural, political, historical, social, and artistic awareness in the past century and his relevance and significance for the present.

Relocated Memories The Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1846-1870.pdf
18.25 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Knowledge And Commitment A Problem Oriented Approach To Literary Studies.pdf
1.22 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Religious Idiom and the African American Novel, 1952-1998.pdf
1.29 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Twenty-First Joyce.pdf
3.92 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.
Crossroads and Cosmologies Diasporas and Ethnogenesis in the New World.pdf
1.87 MB

All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.