Soldier Boy- The Civil War Letters of Charles O. Musser, 29th Iowa

Biographies

Soldier Boy: The Civil War Letters of Charles O. Musser, 29th Iowa by Barry Popchock
No One Ever Asked Me: The World War II Memoirs of an Omaha Indian Soldier by Hollis D. Stabler
At Leningrad’s Gates: The Combat Memoirs of a Soldier with Army Group North by William Lubbeck
Soldier ‚I‘ – The story of an SAS Hero: From Mirbat to the Iranian Embassy Siege and beyond by Michael Paul Kennedy
Soldiering: Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places by Henry G. Gole

Soldier Boy: The Civil War Letters of Charles O. Musser, 29th Iowa by Barry Popchock

English | Mar 1, 2008 | ISBN: 0877455236, 1587296586 | 272 Pages | EPUB | 795 KB

Blood and anger, bragging and pain, are all part of this young Iowa soldier’s vigorous words about war and soldiering. A twenty-year-old farmer from Council Bluffs, Charles O. Musser was one of the 76,000 Iowans who enlisted to wear the blue uniform. He was a prolific writer, penning at least 130 letters home during his term of service with the 29th Iowa Volunteer Infantry.
Soldier Boy makes a significant contribution to the literature of the common soldier in the Civil War. Moreover, it takes a rare look at the Trans-Mississippi theater, which has traditionally been undervalued by historians.
Always Musser dutifully wrote and mailed his letters home. With a commendable eye for historical detail, he told of battles and marches, guerrilla and siege warfare, camp life and garrison soldiering, morale and patriotism, Copperheads and contraband, and Lincoln’s reelection and assassination, creating a remarkable account of activities in this almost forgotten backwater of the war.

No One Ever Asked Me: The World War II Memoirs of an Omaha Indian Soldier by Hollis D. Stabler

English | Dec 1, 2008 | ISBN: 0803243243, 0803220839 | 190 Pages | PDF | 1.1 MB

As a young adolescent, Hollis Dorion Stabler underwent a Native ceremony in which he was given the new name Na-zhin-thia, Slow to Rise. It was a name that no white person asked to know during Hollis’s tour of duty in Anzio, his unacknowledged difference as an Omaha Indian adding to the poignancy of his uneasy fellowship with foreign and American soldiers alike. Stabler’s story—coming of age on the American plains, going to war, facing new estrangement upon coming home—is a universal one, rendered wonderfully strange and personal by Stabler’s uncommon perspective, which embraces two worlds, and by his unique voice.
Stabler’s experiences during World War II—tours of duty in Tunisia and Morocco as well as Italy and France, and the loss of his brother in battle—are at the center of this powerful memoir, which tells of growing up as an Omaha Indian in the small-town Midwest of Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Oklahoma in the 1920s and 1930s. A descendant of the Indians who negotiated with Lewis and Clark on the Missouri River, Stabler describes a childhood that was a curious mixture of progressivism and Indian tradition, and that culminated in his enlisting in the old horse cavalry when war broke out—a path not so very different from that walked by his ancestors. Victoria Smith, of Cherokee-Delaware descent, interweaves historical insight with Stabler’s vivid reminiscences, providing a rich context for this singular life.

At Leningrad’s Gates: The Combat Memoirs of a Soldier with Army Group North by William Lubbeck

English | 30 Nov. 2006 | ISBN: 1844156176, 1935149377 | ASIN: B002FQJP76 | 288 Pages | HTMLZ | 2.27 MB

This is the remarkable story of a German soldier who fought throughout World War II, rising from conscript private to captain of a heavy weapons company on the Eastern Front.
William Lubbeck, age 19, was drafted into the Wehrmacht in August 1939. As a member of the 58th Infantry Division, he received his baptism of fire during the 1940 invasion of France. The following spring his division served on the left flank of Army Group North in Operation Barbarossa. After grueling marches admidst countless Russian bodies, burnt-out vehicles, and a great number of cheering Baltic civilians, Lubbeck’s unit entered the outskirts of Leningrad, making the deepest penetration of any German formation.
The Germans suffered brutal hardships the following winter as they fought both Russian counterattacks and the brutal cold. The 58th Division was thrown back and forth across the front of Army Group North, from Novgorod to Demyansk, at one point fighting back Russian attacks on the ice of Lake Ilmen. Returning to the outskirts of Leningrad, the 58th was placed in support of the Spanish “Blue” Division. Relations between the allied formations soured at one point when the Spaniards used a Russian bath house for target practice, not realizing that Germans were relaxing inside.
A soldier who preferred to be close to the action, Lubbeck served as forward observer for his company, dueling with Russian snipers, partisans and full-scale assaults alike. His worries were not confined to his own safety, however, as news arrived of disasters in Germany, including the destruction of Hamburg where his girlfriend served as an Army nurse.
In September 1943, Lubbeck earned the Iron Cross First Class and was assigned to officers’ training school in Dresden. By the time he returned to Russia, Army Group North was in full-scale retreat. Now commanding his former heavy weapons company, Lubbeck alternated sharp counterattacks with inexorable withdrawal, from Riga to Memel on the Baltic. In April 1945 Lubbeck’s company became stalled in a traffic jam and was nearly obliterated by a Russian barrage followed by air attacks.
In the last chaotic scramble from East Prussia, Lubbeck was able to evacuate on a newly minted German destroyer. He recounts how the ship arrived in the British zone off Denmark with all guns blazing against pursuing Russians. The following morning, May 8, 1945, he learned that the war was over.
After his release from British captivity, Lubbeck married his sweetheart, Anneliese, and in 1949 immigrated to the United States where he raised a successful family. With the assistance of David B. Hurt, he has drawn on his wartime notes and letters, Soldatbuch, regimental history and personal memories to recount his four years of frontline experience. Containing rare firsthand accounts of both triumph and disaster, At Leningrad’s Gates provides a fascinating glimpse into the reality of combat on the Eastern Front.

Soldier ‚I‘ – The story of an SAS Hero: From Mirbat to the Iranian Embassy Siege and beyond by Michael Paul Kennedy

English | Apr 20, 2010 | ISBN: 0747505632, 1846039959 | 408 Pages | EPUB | 3.1 MB

No publicity, no media. We move in silently, do our job, and melt away into the background. If you have the stamina, the willpower and the guts, we’ll welcome you with open arms and you one of us. And if you haven’t, then it’s been very nice knowing you.
Eighteen years in the SAS saw Pete Winner, codenamed Soldier ‘I’, survive the savage battle of Mirbat, parachute into the icy depths of the South Atlantic at the height of the Falklands War, and storm the Iranian Embassy during the most famous hostage crisis in the modern world.
For the first time Pete also details his close-protection work around the world, from the lawless streets of Moscow to escorting aid convoys into war-torn Bosnia. He also unveils the problems of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder faced by many Special Forces veterans, and how he battled his own demons to continue his roller-coaster career. This is his story, written with a breathtaking take-no-prisoners attitude that brings each death-defying episode vividly to life.

Soldiering: Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places by Henry G. Gole

English | Jan 1, 2005 | ISBN: 1574888536, 1574888528 | 280 Pages | PDF | 2.5 MB

A career in the U. S. Army in the second half of the twentieth century was a passageway to every conceivable locale, hospitable and decidedly otherwise. Henry Gole’s experiences lead the reader through the geography of one such career. The recollections of a professional soldier, Henry Gole’s account is a humorous and interesting tale of a man who loved soldiering but not necessarily the organization in which he soldiered. He feels the gratification of having served in the U. S. Army during an era when, personal doubts and political controversy notwithstanding, the world depended on America and its armed forces to preserve freedom. He offers the unique perspective of a member of the “silent generation,” those who immediately followed the World War II generation but find themselves often overlooked by historians and the media. From 1952 through 1988, covering the ordinary rifleman’s view in Korea to the Green Beret’s war in Vietnam, Gole also provides fascinating insight into the professional military at war and how these professionals relate to each other, both under great stress and during periods of decompression. Containing a wealth of leadership lessons that will serve as an invaluable guide for junior NCOs and officers alike, this thoughtful and introspective warrior has also written a moving tribute to the brave soldiers with whom he served.

Soldier Boy- The Civil War Letters of Charles O. Musser, 29th Iowa.epub
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No One Ever Asked Me- The World War II Memoirs of an Omaha Indian Soldier.pdf
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At Leningrad's Gates-The Combat Memoirs of a Soldier with Army Group North.epub
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Soldier 'I' - The story of an SAS Hero- From Mirbat to the Iranian Embassy Siege and beyond.epub
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Soldiering-Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places.pdf
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All content is only for demonstration and educational purposes, we do not store files, and after reading we ask you to buy a printed version of the magazine.